5 Books, 5 Looks

Happy mid-March!

For us, this means that we have March break. Which means that we no longer have a minotaur, Medusa, school, and well GAEA on our heels for a week; all of which are all trying to crush our guts into smithereens. If you did not know, we are now not-so-secretly demigods. As bloggers, this also means one week of hardcore post workouts. Not as in stretches after you workout, but a workout in writing all the posts that we never found the time to do. As per usual. 

Since my demigod powers unfortunately don’t extend to reviewing most books I read, this is me trying to make up the difference. So, these posts are going to simply be some of my short-and-straight-to-the-point bookish thoughts. (Although, I’m the least straight to the point kind of person when I talk. Or at least I do a lot of this thing called rambling).  Anyways, for this first one, I chose a variety of YA that I’ve finished in fall. Basically from last year. So, let’s commence the mini book review marathon!

[Click the covers for the book’s Goodreads page and summaries.]




Extraordinary Means by Robyn Schneider (3.5/5 stars)

 

UK cover

The summary sounded cliched and I will waste no time saying that… it was. It’s a blend of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, but sometimes we can’t help but like cliches. If you find yourself turning enough pages to realize that you’re wanting to find out the obvious, then it’s a winner because it was good, cliche or not. If anything, I think some parts of the book actually tried to counter the cliche of trying to be weird and different and I really liked the humour: it was teen-like and it actually got me laughing out loud. I just felt somewhat satisfied reading this and sometimes a dose of quirky characters is what you need.

 

Cover thoughts: I love the UK one. It’s cool with the whole tree/lung thing… and I love the colours. The “normal” one is nice too but… it’s a bit too normal.

Possibly the best quote in the book:

“‘Hey, Nick, do you know what it would say under your photo in a high school yearbook?’ I asked. ‘Most likely to be friend zoned.’

 ‘Funny,’ Nick grumbled. ‘Sharpen that wit of yours any more and someone might think you actually have a point.’”

This exchange is basically me.

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Book Review: This is What Happy Looks Like

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This is What Happy Looks Like by Jennifer E. Smith

Published on April 2nd 2013 by Headline
Genre: Contemporary, romance, YA
404 pgs

Goodreads Summary:

If fate sent you an email, would you answer? 

When teenage movie star Graham Larkin accidentally sends small town girl Ellie O’Neill an email about his pet pig, the two seventeen-year-olds strike up a witty and unforgettable correspondence, discussing everything under the sun, except for their names or backgrounds.

Then Graham finds out that Ellie’s Maine hometown is the perfect location for his latest film, and he decides to take their relationship from online to in-person. But can a star as famous as Graham really start a relationship with an ordinary girl like Ellie? And why does Ellie want to avoid the media’s spotlight at all costs? Continue reading

Book Review: Fang Girls by Helen Keeble

342 pages
Published: 2012 by HarperTeens
Genres: Contemporary, YA, Humor, Parodies/Satire, Vampires

Hello guys! I may or may not be a vampire, reappearing from the depths of my coffin (aka my desk), to bring you a fang-tastic review. Chemistry and Functions may or may not have changed me… but it’s okay because I’m back.

This book came up as a Goodreads recommendation – I was browsing shelves musing about how much I want to read and how little time I have, and this came up. I decided to burden myself even more by adding this book to my TBR list… I couldn’t help but prioritize it because look at this summary:

Summary (From the back of the book): Sure, the idea of vampires is sexy, but who actually dreams of spending eternity as a pasty, bloodthirsty fifteen-year-old? Not me.

Unfortunately, the somewhat psychotic vampire who turned me into a bloodsucker didn’t bother to ask first. Now I’m dealing with parents who want me to vamp them, a younger brother who’s convinced I’m a zombie, and a seriously ripped vampire hunter who either wants to stake me or make out with me. Not sure which. Oh and PS, none of my favorite fanfic prepared me to deal with vampire politics- which are looking pretty tricky based on the undead elder trying to hunt me down.

What’s a vampire-obsessed fangirl turned real-life fanggirl supposed to do?

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Book Review: Scrawl by Mark Shulman

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Scrawl by Mark Shulman

Genre: Contemporary, High School, Journal-type
Publishing Info: Published on September 14th 2010
by Roaring Brook Press
232 pgs

Book Summary:

Highschooler Tod Munn is a bully and he’s stuck in detention… writing in a notebook. WHY? Good question, I don’t really know. About what? Anything. At school he’s doing pretty alright (besides the bullying aspect, of course) but home is a bit of a different story. He bullies for sure but he’s also humourous. So, what is he going to write about now? We’ll see.

Click here for the Goodreads link!

  ” When I looked up and asked you, ‘What do you want me to write about’ you said, ‘About anything.’

About anything? Okay. Fine with me. You asked for it. I’ll write about this desk.

I hate this desk. It’s nothing but a slab of plastic connected to my chair by a flimsy metal rod… You know, if you put a lefty desk and a righty desk next to each other the right way, the desks really seem like they’re saying ‘I don’t care.’ They look about as bored and uninterested as the rest of us.”

“Here is my last good reason to stay in detention until even the stubby little yellow afterschool buses have taken the rich kids home from practice. It’s cold outside, and our house has broken windows.

  I don’t know where I want to be today. Not here, but not anywhere else either.”

~ Todd, pg 3-4 and pg 9


What was hey or nay about this book? 

Tod Munn’s narrating voice is just interesting to read about. I liked that even while his image is associated with a menacing scowl, he narrates his story quite comically at times and showed reluctance in writing at first which I liked. He’s creative and shows that everyone has multiple sides to them and their own reasons behind their actions.

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Book Review: Unaccompanied Minor

UNACCOMPANIED MINOR

By Hollis Gillespie

256 pages

Publishing Info: On November 18th, 2013 by Merit Press

Genre: YA contemporary, Action, Mystery, Humour, Crime

Book Summary (from Goodreads): Fourteen-year-old April Mae Manning spent her life on airplanes with her flight attendant parents. When her father dies in a crash, April’s mom marries a pilot who turns out to be an abusive jerk, and gets Mom confined to a psychiatric hospital. So April takes off, literally, living on airplanes, using her mother’s flight benefits, relying on the flight crews who know she’s been shuttling between divorcing parents for a year. Then, there’s a hijacking and April flees to the cargo hold with her friend, who is also unaccompanied minor , and they fight to thwart the hijackers, faking a fire, making weapons from things they find in luggage. At last, locked in the cockpit with a wounded police officer, the boy, and his service dog, April tries to remember everything her parents said to do in a crisis above the clouds. But she knows it won’t be enough.

“We see things differently.”

April (and her parent’s co-parenting counselor) pg 11


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Duo Book Review: When by Victoria Laurie

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When By Victoria Laurie

Genres: Fantasy-ish, Contemporary-ish, Mystery, Paranormal/Supernatural, Suspense

336 pgs
Published January 13th 2015 by Disney-Hyperion

“So I wait and hope for a day when a client sits down in front of me, and I tell them their date, and then a miracle happens: I’ll see the date change… And I’ll finally be more than just the messenger.”

~ Maddie, pg 4


 Book Summary

(Taken from Goodreads but we edited and added our own bits and pieces)

Maddie Fynn is a high school junior (S: Like us 😀) who has an ability to see a series of digits hovering above foreheads which her family later finds out are actually death dates. And just like birthdays, everyone has one. (S: Nope. Not me. I’m immortal. Seriously.)

Her alcoholic mother takes advantage of Maddie’s ability to make extra money, but because it only allows her to see the when and not the how, she’s unable to offer any more insight. When the son of one of her clients goes missing on the exact date that she had read, law enforcement turns to (and against) Maddie.

Soon, she is entangled in a homicide investigation where more young people are beginning to disappear and are then found murdered. She is now a suspect for the investigation, a target for the murderer, and attracting the attentions of a mysterious young admirer who may be connected to everything. Maddie’s life is about to be flipped, shaken and stirred (S: and nope this ain’t no cooking show. F: What will be cooking will be your anticipation… boiling to the point where you just can’t take it anymore). She’s somehow the epicenter of it all. Can she right the wrongs before it’s too late?


What was great or gross about the book?

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