White Pine Wednesdays: Delusion Road

Hello world!

Now that you have recovered from our April Fool’s post, we are back to our regularly scheduled (and well written 😉 ) posts!

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This week, I’ll be reviewing Delusion Road… which is actually harder than it sounds. Trying to type this out reminds me of something Paul once said (I can’t find the post right now): it wasn’t a terrible book, it was just… meh. Forgettable. It was enjoyable enough that I finished it without feeling like I was slogging/obliged to read it, but at the same time, it was missing that thing that would have me rate it higher.

It was a solid book all round: even though it was filled with cliches (just look at that summary: I dare you not to roll your eyes). However, it was solid: especially with the character development. Even if the plot was sort of boring, the character arcs (and how they grew) were very interesting. I didn’t hate any characters (which surprises me) as they all had something to add. If anything, the occasional predictability made it comfortable.

This is the kind of book that you have to read in a certain mood, otherwise it feels really meh. I enjoyed the easy style of writing and plot, but it was missing something essential. (The mean, sarcastic person in me says “originality”.)

Even so, I would rate this book 3 out of 5 stars.

~ Sarah

(And I’m really sorry about the short review, but balancing procrastination, building a crane out of popsicles and an English-cum-media assignment/presentation – due on Friday, but assigned on Tuesday – is stressing me out)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Pine Wednesdays: The Outside Circle

Howdy peeps XD


Today, I will completely disappoint Paul (nothing really funny here, sorry) and post a “boring” review. Whilst it may not be the most “rainbows and sunshine” of reviews, this book still shines a light – on some of Canada’s more shaded issues.
My sixth review will be over the very first graphic novel nominee this year (the very first and very only, actually).

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White Pine Wednesday: Rabbit Ears

This week, I’ll be talking about Rabbit Ears, by Maggie de Vries.

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Initial thoughts:

Well. The cover looks familiar (Delusion Road, TAOGSA and Brannan filter), but that’s just me. This also deals with sex, albeit sex work, and looks very, very, very sad. I’ll save this until I’m being annoying. It’ll probably shut me up quick. But anyway, the Robert Pickton (aka the most infamous Canadian serial killer) twist (and the real life relation) are certainly unexpected… I’d like to see how this goes.


After Reading:

Some stories are hard to tell. Some stories are hard to listen to. Some stories are hard to read. Some stories are unsettling, uncomfortable and upsetting. Rabbit Ears is all of theses and more. It deserves to be read, at the very least. Continue reading

White Pine Wednesday: The Story of Owen

Hello fellow bookies! Let’s take a moment to think about the fact that EXAMS ARE OVERRRRRR (good vibes to everyone who still hasn’t finished, though 😛 ). Exams are the reason that this is being published on a Friday.

Only 19 weeks of school left …

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So I read The Story of Owen yesterday. Right after my math exams. And oh boy, if I hated the cover when I first saw it, I LOATHE the cover now.


What I originally thought:

I’m sorry, but what a bad cover. When I look at this, I don’t want to read it. It’ll probably remain in the pile until I absolutely cannot find anything else to read. But the story itself sounds interesting…


What I now think:

The cover of this book should be burned. It scares readers away from this hilarious, smart and very Canadian book. This book has been the best book I’ve read so far. It made me laugh, fascinated me with its world building, and had a great overall message.

It was basically set in an alternate universe, where everything happened… but there were dragons. A direct result of consumerism (and a ‘manifestation’ of global warming), they are attracted to oil and gas (as well as things that use gas). As you can imagine, they are fatal, dangerous… and E.K. Johnston outdid herself with the backstory. In retrospect, it makes sense while you’re reading it, but it’s really hard to explain.

The dragon’s were always there… and in the olden days, every village had it’s own dragon slayer. But now only the big corporations (who pay very well) are able to hire them. So when a dragon slayer family moves back to Trondheim, the town rejoices.

Strangely enough, the narrator, Siobhan McQuaid (and really, more of the main character) doesn’t hero worship Owen, and their ‘relationship’ is really platonic and amusing. It was also very refreshing, and a great distraction from the angst filled books so common in YA.

The book is rather short, but densely packed, so you don’t really notice how much information you are absorbing until you are done. That being said, the plot sort of suffers from the condensation (it felt sort of slapdash, really) but it does manage to come through in the end.

I found it extremely funny, with great social and political commentary. There are beautifully funny lines that made this worth the read, as well as a very Canadian sense of humor. A mixture of self deprecating sarcasm and wise-cracks? What ever it is, I feel so much more Canadian reading this book.

It was a thoroughly enjoyable romp, and a very unlike fantasy. There are no overwhelming villains or quests, but rather, the typical (but at the same time atypical) lives of 2 teenagers. I loved the crowning touches ~ an addition of a Youtube channel (she’s a bard, get it?) as well as many others that gave it a little extra spice. Even though it was obviously set in a rural town, it was still relatable (I’m a city slicker 😛 ). It has strong social, political and environmental messages ~ it wasn’t afraid to go into subjects that ‘bore’ teens. It’s funny, creative and one of my favourite books this month!

Honestly,  it has dragons, and sword fighting, and great characters. Just go read it already!

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars!

 

 

 

White Pine Wednesdays! The Art of Getting Stared At

This post is a continuation of this and this! If you have no idea what I’m talking about, check them out XD

Like I promised yesterday, the very first ever White Pine Wednesday review is The Art of Getting Stared At.

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Now, I won’t rehash the summary (watch the trailer!), but I will rehash my first impressions. When I read the summary, and saw the cover ….

… I think the cover is pretty and relevant (to the summary, at least). It doesn’t excite me, but it’s sending pretty, solid, contemporary vibes at me.

(Look at me, quoting myself :P)

And… I was on point.

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